Skip to main content

In the Media: Unqork CEO Gary Hoberman Writes for The New Stack

Stack of newspapers

Unqork’s CEO and Founder Gary Hoberman contributes to The New Stack to discuss what everyone gets wrong about no-code.

In an op-ed written for The New Stack, Unqork’s CEO and founder Gary Hoberman explained that since the pandemic has only increased engineers’ operational burden, having a better way to build and maintain software is more critical now than ever before. 

While Gary agrees that involving business users in the development process is beneficial, he emphasizes that it’s the IT and engineering teams, not “the business” or citizen developers, who are in desperate need for better tools. Trained engineers are the ones who can truly transform the organization and create the most value through software—they just need a better way to build it.

“Many teams are overworked and under-resourced, responsible for creating and maintaining an effective remote-first environment, on top of all their pre-pandemic responsibilities.”

“Many teams are overworked and under-resourced, responsible for creating and maintaining an effective remote-first environment, on top of all their pre-pandemic responsibilities,” Gary explains. They are expected to create better software, faster and at a lower cost. This is impossible when they barely have the bandwidth to maintain existing software, thanks to issues like bugs and security vulnerabilities caused by legacy code. 

Gary posits that no-code is the answer struggling engineers are looking for to deliver on these seemingly unreasonable expectations. No-code application building platforms like Unqork automate the monotonous tasks that take up so much of an engineer’s time, allowing them to move quickly and focus on initiatives that drive value for the business. No-code also eliminates future headaches (e.g., debugging, dead code, system malfunctions, etc.) by eliminating the inherent flaws that code generates. 

The piece ends with a reminder that this does not mean business users and engineering teams shouldn’t be collaborating. “When done correctly, this collaboration greatly accelerates the development of applications that meet the specific needs of the business, without creating a headache for engineering teams or leaving them to clean up the business’s tech mess.”

You can read the full piece on The New Stack’s website